#Walkmyworld You are the metaphor

For week three #walkmyworld returns to our our roots. We will explore metaphors of our identity using two texts: Identity by Julio Noboa Polanco and The Rose That Grew from Concrete by Tupac Shakur. Go ahead read these texts, annotate them and find the metaphors the poets used to explore the identities.

Polanco Started it All (or RIP Poetry)

Polanco’s poem Identity started it all. It was in the firstanthology of  poetry and technology that @Suerp25 used. We invited Ian along and six years later #walkmyworld was born.

 I have ridden with  Polanco’s poem since the beginning. My first publication reported on my 6th grade  students creating multimodal extended metaphor poems. Sue, Ian, and I used this poem to launch the poetry project that would become #walkmyworld.

Then this year we killed off poetry. We chose to focus on shifting texts and identity.

This met our audience better than a poet. I just wonder…is there any better way to explore identities and multimodal affordances than with poetry?

 

Need an Idea for our Third Walk?

Are you struggiling with a way to represent yourself for the third learning event? Why not look to our history and write an extended metaphor poem for yourself or have you class work on the project.

I created a no-fi/lo-fi/wifi option of the extended metaphor poem on our maker menu. I love this lesson. I have taught it from Kindergarten to graduate school. The poets I work with always love the activity. They explore identity and meaning making.

It is a really easy activity to complete with so many possibilities for complexity.

  • Compare yourself to something.
  • Make it Meaningful
  • Find an Image or Write your Poem
  • Write your Poem or Find an Image
  • Put it together into a multimodal poem
    • You can use paper and pencils
    • You can use PowerPoint, Google Slides, or Haiku Deck
    • You could use Canvas.com
    • You could use HTML/CSS

This is just one option for our third walk. Have fun.

Greg McVerry

Greg McVerry is a teacher, researcher and scholar at Southern Connecticut State University.

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