Applying for the Web Ninja Badge

Update: I submitted my badge application and recieved feedback from Doug.

This “just for fun” badge actually documents the successful work flow of a badge. Doug created the badge, explained the competencies being addressed, described the evidence needed. I then submitted my material. Doug reviewed it and left me this feedback:

2014-04-30_10-24-19

 

I then went back and revised my original post. If you want to track my edits look at my source code I left the old version in html comment form.

Doug Belshaw issued a challenge. As part of the Mozilla Web Literacy Map roll out he encouraged folks to submit artifacts that would demonstrate competencies on three areas of the map,

Screen Shot 2014-04-25 at 13.57.10

 

I am submitting my badge under the working title of Wisdom, Virtue, Sincerity, Valor, and Austerity in Online Spaces.

Exploring

Navigation

  • Accessing the web using the common features of web browsers– I try to teach students how to to explore the web by creating and remixing videos and think alouds of online data: I created videos of students reading online that I allow others to use
  • Using hyperlinks to access a range of resources on the web- I try to find and share links to open education resources such as this one. I was looking for OER sources on the web, and put out a call on Twitter. This link came back to me.
  • Reading, evaluating, and manipulating URLs I wrote a dissertation on differences in searching and evaluating online sources.
  • Recognizing the visual cues in everyday web services- I make online minilessons to teach students how to search the internet and research ways to teach credibility.

Searching

  • Using keywords, search operators, and keyboard shortcuts to make web searches more efficient –My  dissertation research focused on improving search results.
  • Finding real-time or time-sensitive information using a range of search techniques- I write about the need to teach and read socially complex texts.

Credibility

  • Researching authorship and ownership of websites and their content- I create online materials to teach students to focus on authorship.

Security

  • I use my brain as my virus and phishing detector.

Building

Composing for the web

  • Inserting hyperlinks into a web page-  This post
  • Embedding multimedia content into a web page-I can embed multimedia into posts.
  • Creating web resources in ways appropriate to the medium/genre- I write in a variety of places using the norms of thos sites such as Medium.
  • Identifying and using HTML tags- I used the comment tags so people could track the revision history on this post.

Remixing

  • Identifying and using openly-licensed work- The image I remixed for the header on this post used two openly licensed images.
  • Combining multimedia resources and Creating something new on the web using existing resources- I make remixes using popcorn.

Design and Accessibility

  • Iterating on a design after feedback from a target audience– I got feedback from Doug and then revised this post. This website is the rough draft of my life
  • Improving the accessibility of a web page by modifying its color scheme and markup- I try hard to choose color schemes that allow those with red/green color blindness to differentiate.
  • Demonstrating the difference between inline, embedded and external CSS- I spent this semester trying to use Thimble to teach myself CSS. I have created my first page that no longer uses HTML tables but relies on CSS containers. The actual page isn’t live yet (Department website but containers work

Coding and Scripting

  • Composing working loops and arrays and Using a script framework- I dabbled in javascript when creating a simulated web environment. I do not know java but if I can stare at code long enough I see patterns, kind of like poetry, and can then edit the code. I made changes to the timing and feedback loops.

Connecting

Sharing

  • Tracking changes made to co-created web resources– This is the first collaborative story I wrote in Gdocs with my 6th graders.
  • Co-creating web resources- Ian and I edit the digital texts and tools page. Please join us and add your stuff.
  • Configuring notifications to keep up to date with community spaces and interactions– Much to my wife’s chagrin as things chirp and beep all day long.
  • Using synchronous and asynchronous tools to communicate with web communities, networks and groups– I use asychnronous and synchronous chat in my teaching.

Collaborating

  • Encouraging participation in web communities– I encourage folks to be digital residences.

Community Participation

  • Using constructive criticism in a group or community setting -I use online communities on Google+ for Feedback.
  • Defining different terminology used within online communities- I use the discourse of specific affinity spaces and use these spaces for learning.

Privacy

  • Identifying rights retained and removed through user agreements– I added the Creative Commons plug in to this site.

Open

  • Distinguishing between open and closed licensing- I use only open lecensed images on this site.

As we live online we navigate a sea of myriad rivers merging. Those who use the web literacy map can guide multiple streams of information.

As educators we need to draw a map (of the territory such as the Web Literacy Map) using creativity and all means available to you. To [further] illustrate this point, when even the roads are unknown, enter the online spaces, and familiarize yourself with the languages and practices. Determine which areas have steep learning curves, which areas are wide open, and measure the width of roads to understanding.

Bansenshukai. Ninpo.com. 

Greg McVerry

Greg McVerry is a teacher, researcher and scholar at Southern Connecticut State University.

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